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Vaginal dryness

Normal uterine anatomy (cut section)


Vaginal dryness is present when the tissues of the vagina are no longer well-lubricated and healthy.

Alternative Names

Vaginitis - atrophic; Vaginitis due to reduced estrogen; Atrophic vaginitis; Menopause vaginal dryness


Atrophic vaginitis is caused by a decrease in estrogen.

Estrogen keeps the tissues of the vagina lubricated and healthy. Normally, the lining of the vagina makes a clear, lubricating fluid. This fluid makes sexual intercourse more comfortable. It also helps decrease vaginal dryness.

If estrogen levels drop off, the vaginal tissue shrinks and becomes thinner. This causes dryness and inflammation.

Estrogen levels normally drop after menopause. The following may also cause estrogen levels to drop:

Some women develop this problem right after childbirth or while breastfeeding. Estrogen levels are lower at these times.

The vagina can also become further irritated from soaps, laundry detergents, lotions, perfumes, or douches. Certain medicines, smoking, tampons, and condoms may also cause or worsen vaginal dryness.


Symptoms include:

Exams and Tests

A pelvic exam shows that the walls of the vagina are thin, pale or red.

Your vaginal discharge may be tested to rule out other causes for the condition. You may also have hormone level tests to find out if you are in menopause.


There are many treatments for vaginal dryness. Before treating your symptoms on your own, a health care provider must determine the cause of the problem.

Prescription estrogen can work well to treat atrophic vaginitis. It is available as a cream, tablet, suppository, or ring. All of these are placed directly into the vagina. These medicines deliver estrogen directly to the vaginal area. Only a little estrogen is absorbed into the bloodstream.

You may take estrogen (hormone therapy) in the form of a skin patch, or in a pill that you take by mouth if you have hot flashes or other symptoms of menopause.

Women should discuss the risks and benefits of estrogen replacement therapy with their provider.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Proper treatment will ease symptoms most of the time.

Possible Complications

Vaginal dryness can:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you have vaginal dryness or soreness, burning, itching, or painful sexual intercourse that does not go away when you use a water-soluble lubricant.


Eckert LO, Lentz G. Infections of the lower and upper genital tracts. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 23.

Grady D, Barrett-Connor E. Menopause. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 240.

Lobo RA. Menopasue and care of the mature woman. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 14.

Review Date: 11/5/2015
Reviewed By: Cynthia D. White, MD, Fellow American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Group Health Cooperative, Bellevue, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.